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November 30, 2012
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What IS Vexel Art Anyway?

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 4:41 AM by TheLastHuzzah:iconthelasthuzzah:
So, hello then :D I am the newly appointed Community Volunteer for the Vexel gallery, taking over from the ever-wonderful jussta! :love: I am here to provide you with support and entertainment, and to be a bridge between you and the deviantART $taff :dummy:

You will be excited to know that I already have a contest in the planning for next year, but in the mean time while I find my feet in the volunteer world, I can tell you that vexelove has both a contest and a collab you can take part in at the moment, and you can find the details here: fav.me/d5jxxjz :la:

And, my dear vexel artists, take a look at TheVexelGroup, your vexel community hub of info and goings-on, also with a gallery you can submit to :dalove:

:star: So... What IS Vexel Art anyway?

I always thought the easiest way to describe it was by calling it digital cut paper. When you make a traditional cut paper piece, you are using shapes of paper all built up to create an image - vexel is the same sort of thing, but its all digital instead, using blocks of solid colour or gradients to create a full image :D

These blocks of colour are usually created with a pen tool or lasso tool of some sort, though names vary between programs. The techniques found in vexel art are often similar to those found in vector art, but there are many differences, the most obvious being that vector art is infinitely scalable without loss of quality, whereas vexel art - much like cut paper - cannot be resized in such a way, but can only be resized in the same way as most other digital formats, and scaling would result in pixellation and/or blurry-ness.

Some artists use just a couple of layers of colour to create their images, and some artists use hundreds of layers, and some artists, like me, go somewhere in between. Here's some lovely portraits to help demonstrate!

plastic bag by yummiedesire L-U-S-T by Lullipops alejandro by womanwithagun
SMILE HYO by gershonv as fast as you think by pazforward


And here's some links that will help you, which can always be found on the front page of TheVexelGroup :eager:

:bulletpink: The Definition of Vexel
:bulletpink: Vexel FAQ
:bulletpink: Vector, Vexel or Mixed Media?
:bulletpink: The Difference between Vector and Vexel
:bulletpink: Getting into Vector and Vexel Artwork
:bulletpink: Stock: Tips & Hints for New Vexel/Vector Artists
:bulletpink: Vexed over Vexel


So! That's all for now :D Please feel free to drop by and say hi, let me know a bit about you, I'd love to get to know my watchers more :love:

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:iconastrikos:
Astrikos Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012   General Artist
:la:
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Professional General Artist
I'm going to be all confusing now and probably confuse myself more and then confuse you along the way.

Vector and Vexel.

So they share a similar look, but a Vector is created in a Vector Program (AI, Inkscape etc) and a Vexel is created in a Raster Program (PS, GIMP etc)?

Main question was regarding an attitude I found in a Vexel contest that had me thoroughly confused. Since when you make a Vector in Inkscape you can indeed scale it infinitely, but in order to put it on the internet I have to turn it into a raster image, which usually involves exporting it as a png which I then crop in GIMP, which of course then turns it into an image I cannot scale infinitely.

Said contest host said that she would "be able to tell" if the entries were Vector instead of Vexel, but for me had I created an image with the pen tool in GIMP it would probably look exactly the same as a Vector I would create in Inkscape when the Vector was Rasterised for internet upload.

So other than the technical differences between Vector and Raster graphics, are there really any differences in the case that the host was being pissy about being able to tell if the image was a Vector? Because there's no technique in any of the examples that I couldn't also replicate in Inkscape, so the visual style is very similar.

And in that case what's to 'stop' me from making my graphic in Inkscape and submitting as a Vexel (or to said vexel contest), or Making in GIMP and submitting as a Vector, as both end products have to be rasterised for deviantART display...
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:iconpica-ae:
pica-ae Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Personally I don't think you can tell :B Sometimes people can't even tell Vector from a Digital Painting ;)

The only way she could tell, and I have seen contest do this, was if one requirement was to upload the actual file somewhere (.eps, .ai or whatever format you worked in) or a outline view of the vector (AI allows for that).

Tbh I have created Vectors in Photoshop myself and called them Vexel cos I was very confused about what it was when I started out :slow:

I don't know how the contest host wanted to figure out whether something is Vector or Vexel, but your points are all valid and I would just count on 1) people being honest or 2) just test her :B
Reply
:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Professional General Artist
So in the end Vector and Vexel more are to do with the behind the scenes technical than the actual end outcome?
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:iconpica-ae:
pica-ae Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
As I see it, yes :)

I mean, with the right filter a 3D work can look like a painting or a vector or a lineart and other way around. It is just a matter of deciding how to differ between works, in this case technique, as opposed to f.e. purpose.
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Professional General Artist
Yes, I've always been of the opinion it's the work itself rather than how it's made that matters, but some people, Vexellers especially I find, get very irate when you misname things.
Reply
:iconpica-ae:
pica-ae Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Yeah, I don't like the seperation into processes too much, but it's how it is :meow:

I know, some people are very strict about what is what and can sometimes get a bit elitist about it :/
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Professional General Artist
It happens. It's like tool and pixel dolls (though they have a much clearer definition) I'm sort of like "They're all dolls!"
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:iconpica-ae:
pica-ae Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
haha yeah, I guess it will always happen :D
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:iconurus-28:
Urus-28 Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ok, now I know what is the difference between vector and vexel :p
I was thinking there were just different name for the same thing =P
Thank you for correct me =D
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